Good cheer

Been feeling an assortment of sadnesses lately, including feeling like I really don’t offer that much to anything.  Solution: send encouraging messages to friends and family with the challenges I know they’re facing.  Thinking about cheering them on actually cheers me up a little bit, and it helps me feel connected to things.  If this is my coping mechanism, I think I can live with it.    

smartgirlsattheparty

nprbooks:

Don’t worry: No puppies were drowned in the making of Underwater Puppies. Photographer Seth Casteel says his shoots actually doubled as pool safety lessons:

So many people forget that our swimming pools, as much fun as they are, they are a danger, and they can be a danger to … our fur children. … I mean, a lot of these puppies I work with — for Underwater PuppiesI worked with over 1,500 — all it took was just a few times, putting them in the water and teaching them where the exit is, and they figured it out.

More photos (and Casteel’s interview on Morning Edition) here!

-Nicole

parislemon

parislemon:

Amy Qin on the latest cinema trend emerging in China:

The new “bullet screen,” or danmu, model of movie-watching that has recently been introduced in select theaters in China can perhaps be most pithily summed up with the title of the 2010 Chinese action comedy “Let the Bullets Fly.”

In this case, the bullets don’t refer to actual bullets, but to text messages that audience members send via their mobile phones while watching the film. The messages are then projected onto the screen, so that at any given time the scene may be overlaid with multiple “bullets,” or comments, scrolling across the screen.

Pop-Up Video. But in a theater. With content populated by the crowd. Of teens. What could go wrong?

smartgirlsattheparty

cjwho:

Time is a Dimension | Fong Qi Wei

The beauty of photography, and the same reason the medium is famous for, is freezing time. It gives us the chance to more or less freeze and pull a moment out of it’s context, and make it possible to look at one particular moment again and again, feeding you visual memory. And yet it is nearly impossible to visualize time itself in a photograph. Singapore based photographer, Fong Qi Wei , managed to do so though. By layering different photos of the same spot he shot within 2 to 4 hours, mostly during sunrise or sunset, he creates sequences of time captured in one image.

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